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New comedy movie collection on DVD
#1
The Renown Pictures Comedy Collection Vol. 1

The excellent vintage movie organisation Renown Film Club is currently offering a fascinating collection of own-label comedy documentaries, feature movies and rarities, for a bargain-basement price.
The 3-disc set includes a Bob Monkhouse documentary with scores of clips from early movies - including some Melies footage - and many rarities including John Bunny, Ford Sterling, Pearl White and dozens of other legendary names. This documentary alone is worth the price of the set.
Another disc includes the Lifetime of Comedy compilation of clips from classic silent movies, with a narrative from Kent Walton in a rare break from his commentaries on professional wrestling.
The movies include the star-studded "Larkins family" feature Inn For Trouble, led by the fire-breathing Peggy Mount. There's also a sample of the "Carry On" series with Carry On Admiral and the inescapable Dentist In The Chair featuring Monkhouse in comedy acting mode.
The 3-disc set is priced at £15.00 with free UK postage, but for members only, and membership is free - and recommended for all movie fans. Membership brings a monthly e-mail bulletin of news and events, in addition to the huge savings on the "public" price of sets like this one.
Renown is an enthusiast-based company that specialises in black and white movies, mainly of the 'B' picture type (and the only source I know of Mr. Pastry movies) and operates the Talking Pictures TV channel (Sky and others). It also runs an annual film festival in the UK and promotes vintage film in other ways.
Check out Renown on its website
http://us11.campaign-archive1.com/?u=d22...8739594d9b
and within the UK call them (free) on 0808 178 8212.
 
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#2
(11-09-2016, 07:48 PM)judgefoozle Wrote: The Renown Pictures Comedy Collection Vol. 1

The excellent vintage movie organisation Renown Film Club is currently offering a fascinating collection of own-label comedy documentaries, feature movies and rarities, for a bargain-basement price.
The 3-disc set includes a Bob Monkhouse documentary with scores of clips from early movies - including some Melies footage - and many rarities including John Bunny, Ford Sterling, Pearl White and dozens of other legendary names. This documentary alone is worth the price of the set.
Another disc includes the Lifetime of Comedy compilation of clips from classic silent movies, with a narrative from Kent Walton in a rare break from his commentaries on professional wrestling.
The movies include the star-studded "Larkins family" feature Inn For Trouble, led by the fire-breathing  Peggy Mount. There's also a sample of the "Carry On" series with Carry On Admiral and the inescapable Dentist In The Chair featuring Monkhouse in comedy acting mode.
The 3-disc set is priced at £15.00 with free UK postage, but for members only, and membership is free - and recommended for all movie fans. Membership brings a monthly e-mail bulletin of news and events, in addition to the huge savings on the "public" price of sets like this one.
Renown is an enthusiast-based company that specialises in black and white movies, mainly of the 'B' picture type (and the only source I know of Mr. Pastry movies) and operates the Talking Pictures TV channel (Sky and others). It also runs an annual film festival in the UK and promotes vintage film in other ways.
Check out Renown on its website
http://us11.campaign-archive1.com/?u=d22...8739594d9b
and within the UK call them (free) on  0808 178 8212.

Are any of the Carry On films any good? Does the humor translate to an American like myself?
 
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#3
That's an interesting question. In some ways, humour is universal, like the eternal banana-skin trip and the pie in the face, but the Carry On genre is archetypally British. It's not satire and doesn't relate to British politics or lifestyle really, but it does "carry on" the tradition of the music halls in bawdy humour, double-meanings and to some extent the class structure. Many of the films are set outside the UK, such as in the jungle, on a Spanish holiday (which is actually a bit of a satire on the package tours industry) in a mythical desert war zone, in the American "wild west" and on a cruise ship, but the jokes are nearly all the same. It's a genre that relies heavily on team chemistry, which breathes life into the tired old jokes and cringing scripts. Phil Silvers appeared in one of them and stood out like the proverbial sore thumb. Maybe it just about translates into American tastes, but because it relies so heavily on silly names and double-meanings, the Carry On genre is really only suitable for English-language audiences.
 
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#4
(17-09-2016, 10:09 AM)judgefoozle Wrote: That's an interesting question. In some ways, humour is universal, like the eternal banana-skin trip and the pie in the face, but the Carry On genre is archetypally British. It's not satire and doesn't relate to British politics or lifestyle really, but it does "carry on" the tradition of the music halls in bawdy humour, double-meanings and to some extent the class structure. Many of the films are set outside the UK, such as in the jungle, on a Spanish holiday (which is actually a bit of a satire on the package tours industry) in a mythical desert war zone, in the American "wild west" and on a cruise ship, but the jokes are nearly all the same. It's a genre that relies heavily on team chemistry, which breathes life into the tired old jokes and cringing scripts. Phil Silvers appeared in one of them and stood out like the proverbial sore thumb. Maybe it just about translates into American tastes, but because it relies so heavily on silly names and double-meanings, the Carry On genre is really only suitable for English-language audiences.

So do you think they're worth buying on DVD? Are you a fan of the films?
 
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#5
That's a bit like asking someone if they like fruit, or travelling. The Carry On movies are so diverse in their individual ways that it's impossible to generalise. What they all have in common is the scripting of silly names and double meanings, so there's a dichotomy between their individuality and their commonality. For me, that means - for the newcomer - that you wouldn't buy a box-set until you've seen at least one "typical" movie, but there's the problem, finding a "typical" example. For one thing, the early movies of the genre were in black and white, so there's an immediate variation. For another, in addition to the basic "usual suspects" cast there were additional guest stars like Phil Silvers, Frankie Howerd, Roy Castle and Harry Secombe. At least these factors help to make the choice. The one to be avoided at all costs is Carry On Columbus, which was a terrible and disastrous attempt to revive the format after most of the original cast had died, and it bombed at the box office. My considered advice is to pick up (by chance) a very cheap individual DVD at a street market or suchlike, and see if you like it. The comedy of silly names and double meanings may make you cringe or chuckle, and then you can decide if you want more. Carry On Camping is often regarded as one of the funniest and certainly it was in that era that these formula comedies were at their best. At their worst they were terrible, but as always, it comes down to individual taste.
 
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